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Undesirable Global Cache Statistics

Oracle RAC Cluster Tips by Burleson Consulting

This is an excerpt from the bestselling book Oracle Grid & Real Application Clusters.  To get immediate access to the code depot of working RAC scripts, buy it directly from the publisher and save more than 30%.


The following are undesirable statistics or statistics for which the values should always be as near to zero as possible:

* global cache blocks lost: This statistic shows block losses during transfers. High values indicate network problems. The use of an unreliable IPC protocol such as UDP may result in the value for global cache blocks lost being non-zero. When this occurs, take the ratio of global cache blocks lost divided by global cache current blocks served plus global cache cr blocks served. This ratio should be as small as possible. Many times, a non-zero value for global cache blocks lost does not indicate a problem because Oracle will retry the block transfer operation until it is successful.

* global cache blocks corrupt: This statistic shows if any blocks were corrupted during transfers. If high values are returned for this statistic, there is probably an IPC, network, or hardware problem.

An example SELECT to determine if further examination is needed would be:

SELECT
      A.VALUE "GC BLOCKS LOST 1",
      B.VALUE "GC BLOCKS CORRUPT 1",
      C.VALUE "GC BLOCKS LOST 2",
      D.VALUE "GC BLOCKS CORRUPT 2"
FROM GV$SYSSTAT A, GV$SYSSTAT B, GV$SYSSTAT C, GV$SYSSTAT D
WHERE A.INST_ID=1 AND A.NAME='gc blocks lost'
  AND B.INST_ID=1 AND B.NAME='gc blocks corrupt'
  AND C.INST_ID=2 AND C.NAME='gc blocks lost'
  AND D.INST_ID=2 AND D.NAME='gc blocks corrupt';

A sample result from the above select should look like the following:

GC BLOCKS LOST 1 GC BLOCKS CORRUPT 1 GC BLOCKS LOST 2 GC BLOCKS CORRUPT 2
---------------- ------------------- ---------------- -------------------
               0                   0              652                   0

In this result, instance 2 is showing some problems with lost blocks, so it might be useful to look at the ratio described above:

SELECT A.INST_ID "INSTANCE", A.VALUE "GC BLOCKS LOST",
B.VALUE "GC CUR BLOCKS SERVED",
C.VALUE "GC CR BLOCKS SERVED",
A.VALUE/(B.VALUE+C.VALUE) RATIO
FROM GV$SYSSTAT A, GV$SYSSTAT B, GV$SYSSTAT C
WHERE A.NAME='gc blocks lost' AND
      B.NAME='gc current blocks served' AND
      C.NAME='gc cr blocks served' and
      B.INST_ID=a.inst_id AND
      C.INST_ID = a.inst_id;

  Instance gc blocks lost gc cur blocks served gc cr blocks served      RATIO
---------- -------------- -------------------- ------------------- ----------
         1              0                 3923                2734          0
         2            652                 3008                4380 .088251218

The question now becomes, how small is "as small as possible"? In this example, database instance one takes 22 seconds to perform a series of tests and instance two takes 25 minutes.

Investigation showed that the TCP receive and send buffers on instance two were set at 64K. Since this is an 8k-block size instance with a db_file_multiblock_read_count of 16, this was causing excessive network traffic because the system was using full table scans resulting in a read of 128K. In addition, the actual TCP buffer area was set to a small number. Setting these values for the TCP receive and send buffers is an operating specific operation. DBA?s should talk this over with the system operator or check out:

http://www.psc.edu/networking/perf_tune.html

The following section covers example commands for various operating systems.

DEC Alpha (Digital UNIX)

$ dbx -k /vmunix
(dbx) assign sb_max = (u_long) 524288
(dbx) patch sb_max = (u_long) 524288

The first command changes the value for the operating system and the second patches the value into the kernel so it will not be lost at the next reboot. mbclusters can be modified to at least 832, and the kernel variables tcp_sendspace and tcp_recvspace cam also be modified in this manner. Under version 4.0, use the sysconfig -r inet <variable> <value> command to do this type of modification.

 


This is an excerpt from the bestselling book Oracle Grid & Real Application Clusters, Rampant TechPress, by Mike Ault and Madhu Tumma.

You can buy it direct from the publisher for 30%-off and get instant access to the code depot of Oracle tuning scripts.

http://www.rampant-books.com/book_2004_1_10g_grid.htm


 

 
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Note: This Oracle documentation was created as a support and Oracle training reference for use by our DBA performance tuning consulting professionals.  Feel free to ask questions on our Oracle forum.

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